Following from the Bishopston Society's application to English Heritage to have Bishop Road School listed, we have received the following letter and attached inspection report from English Heritage:

Bishop Bishop Road Primary School, Bishop Road, Bristol

Further to our previous correspondence, I am writing to advise you that we have completed our initial assessment of the above building to consider whether it has special architectural or historic interest.

I attach a copy of our consultation report (see below) which sets out the factual information upon which we will base our recommendation to the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

Yours sincerely

Fridy Duterloo-Morgan
Designation Adviser - West
English Heritage
Designation Team West
29 Queen Square
Bristol
BS1 4ND


English Heritage (Designation) Consultation Report 05 December 2013

Case Name: Bishop Road Primary School
Case Number: 1417955

Background

English Heritage has received an application for the listing of Bishop Road Primary School,
Bishop Road, Bristol, prompted by concerns over a planning application (Ref 13/04795/F) for a two storey extension to the front of the school on Bishop Road, incorporating a new entrance, reception/waiting area and offices on the ground floor, with a new library and meeting room on the first floor and an extension at the rear. At the playing field site an existing former Scout Hut is to be replaced with a single storey building incorporating toilets and changing facilities and flexible learning spaces. A current temporary modular building near the main school is to become a permanent building. The planning application is to be determined on 17 December 2013 and as such the case has been marked as hot, with a shortened consultation period.


Asset(s) under Assessment

Facts about the asset(s) can be found in Annex 1 to this report.

Annex: 1    Name: Bishop Road Primary School   Heritage Category: Listing
Visits: Date, 26 November 2013    Visit Type: Full inspection


English Heritage (Designation) Consultation Report 05 December 2013

Annex 1

The factual details are being assessed as the basis for a proposed addition to The National Heritage List for England.

Factual Details
Name: Bishop Road Primary School
Location: Bishop Road Primary School, Bishop Road, Bristol, BS7 8LS

District: City of Bristol District   Type: Unitary Authority    Parish: Non Civil Parish

History
Bishop Road Primary School in Horfield, Bristol, is a former Board School of 1895-6, probablyby the architect William Venn Gough (1842-1918) who designed the extensions of 1902-5. The school, built for the Horfield School Board, opened in January 1896 to serve the newly-expanding suburb of Bishopston, characterised by late-C19 and early-C20 terraced housing.

The first headmaster, Mr Edgar, set high standards and pupils often won scholarships to local grammar schools whilst others achieved success through sport. The school soon expanded to cater for girls and boys from the age of 5 to 14 and was housed in the three main buildings which survive today (Edgar Building, Grant Building and Silverthorne Building). The second edition Ordnance Survey map published in 1903 shows the current Edgar Building and Grant Building. As indicated by the revised Ordnance Survey map published in 1916, the Silverthorne Building to the north had been added by then, and the former infant school wing to the east of the Edgar Building had been extended to the rear.

In 1939 the pupils' leaving age was raised and subsequently part of the school was used for secondary education. After the Second World War the school educated children from 5 to 16 years (Infant, Junior and Secondary), housed in the three buildings on the site. During the 1960s and 70s the Silverthorne Building was used as a Teacher Training Centre. In 1979 the Infant and Junior Schools were amalgamated to form the current Primary School. The Secondary School closed in the mid-1980s and was replaced with a nursery (recently closed).

Today, with circa 630 pupils, Bishop Road is one of the largest primary schools in the City. Famous former pupils include the Bristol born stage- and film actor Cary Grant (born Archibald Alexander Leach, 1904 - 1986), who became one of classic Hollywood's leading actors, and the Bristol-born theoretical physicist Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902-1984), who made fundamental contributions to the early development of quantum mechanics and electrodynamics, and won a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1933.

Horfield School Board was set up in 1871 under the provisions of the Public Elementary Education Act of 1870. Boundary extensions of 1897 led to a merger of the board with Bristol School Board which operated from 1871 to 1903. The use of the Gothic or Tudor style was prevalent for Board Schools in Bristol until the 1890s after which the Queen Anne style, following examples in London, was also used. Board Schools in Bristol frequently have a high central hall with spreading single storey blocks around it.

William Venn Gough, born in 1842 in Frome, Somerset, is an important Victorian architect who was based in Bristol. From 1872 he had an office in Nicholas Street, and between 1898 and 1906 he was based in Hampton Road before moving to Bridge Street in 1914. He designed many prominent buildings in the City, such as Cabot Tower, Brandon Hill, 1897-98 (listed at Grade II and situated with a Grade II registered park) and the former Port of Bristol Authority Docks Office in Queen Square, 1889, listed at Grade II. However, Gough is probably best known for his school buildings in Bristol, which include Colston's Girls School, 1891(listed at Grade II), Bedminster Bridge Board School, c1895 (listed at Grade II) and St MaryRedcliffe and Temple School House, 1895 (listed at Grade II).

Details
A former Board School of 1895-6 in Tudor style, probably by William Venn Gough who designed the extensions of 1902-5.

MATERIALS: the three school buildings (Edgar Building with the Lodge facing Bishop Road, Grant Building and Silverthorne Building) are constructed in random coursed Pennant stone with limestone dressings.

The roofs to Edgar Building are covered in red mathematical tiles, except for the rear left hand wing with the hall, which has plain red replacement tiles. The pitched roofs to the hall have four rows of three Velux roof-lights, inserted in the late C20. The central two-storey block to the Edgar Building has a hipped roof with a decorative central cupola (in timber and lead), and a large axial limestone ventilation stack with shafts and with small limestone stacks to each gable end. The Lodge has a pitched roof also covered in mathematical tiles, and has tall gable end stacks. The pitched roofs to Grant- and Silverthorne Building are covered in plain red tiles. The eastern roof slope to the Grant Building carries forty solar panels recently introduced.

PLAN: Overall, the plan-form of the buildings has survived largely intact, though some of the larger (class)rooms have been subdivided. Edgar Building occupies the southern part of the site facing Bishop Road. It consists of a central square hall surrounded by classrooms and a library, with attached to the east side the former nursery wing which has an irregular plan. Attached to the south front is a former toilet block, and the caretakers lodge with pupils' entrances to either side (now no longer used).

Grant Building, situated to the north-west of Edgar Building, has a rectangular plan with a central corridor now lined with classrooms to the west and formerly a hall to its east, now subdivided into further classrooms. At its north end is a gym, built in the later C20 and replacing a former building attached to this end of the building. Further modern flat-roofed extensions are added to its south end.

Silverthorne Building, built circa 1902-5, occupies the north part of the site and has an L-shaped plan consisting of a hall lined with classrooms and entrance lobby to its north. At its east end it has a modern flat-roofed extension.

In the triangular-shaped playground that forms the far north-west corner of the site stands a temporary classroom building introduced in the late C20.

EXTERIOR: the two storey Lodge, facing Bishop Road, has a full dormer with three six-over-six paned timber sash windows set above a large, decorative plat band with stone carved lettering reading 'SCHOOL BOARD FOR HORFIELD'. Below at ground-floor level it has a central entrance with a late-C20 timber door, with a six-by-six paned timber sash window to either side. Attached to the left and right hand corners are two decorative four-centred-arched entrances (now no longer used), with stone carved lettering above reading 'GIRLS' and 'INFANTS'. The iron gates to the arches are late-C20 replacements. Extending to either side of the arched entrances (along Bishop Road and Cambridge Road), is a stone rubble dwarf wall with curved stone coping, and decorative stone piers set at regular intervals, holding cast-iron spear-headed railings (probably a later replacement). Attached to the rear of the Lodge is a single storey flat roofed toilet block, formerly this had a central glazed lantern to the roof, as indicated by a photograph of the school of circa 1900, which also shows how this toilet block separated the infants' school wing to the right from the girls' school wing to the left.

Behind the Lodge the south front of Edgar Building facing Bishop Road, consists of a two-storey central block with lower wings extending to either side. The right hand side of this main elevation (the former infants, later nursery school) could formerly be seen from Bishop Road and Cambridge Road (as shown on the photograph of circa 1900), but is now unfortunately obscured by tree growth and a modern flat-roofed electrical mains building. The central block has three full dormers each with triple limestone-mullioned windows with round-arched lights. At ground-floor level are two round-arched entrances set between tall six-over-six paned sash windows. The triple sash windows to the left-hand side may haveformerly been open, as they are aligned with three round arches, probably former pupil entrances. The lower wing to the west has three full dormers, that to the far west containing the headmaster's room with three small six-over-six paned sash windows. Below, there are three small windows at ground-floor level, possibly formerly open as they are aligned with three internal open arches, and as such may be former pupil entrances. The other two dormers have full-height triple-mullioned windows with round-arched lights, as before. The north elevation of Edgar Building has tall gable ends each with tall, triple stone-mullioned windows with a relieving arch above, and flanked to either side by slightly lower stone mullion windows. The original timber windows have all been replaced with plastic ones. The main elevation to the east has four gables each with full-height double stone mullioned round-headed lights (except for that at the far right-hand side). In between the gables are small double stone mullions, with the second one to the right now converted into an entrance with a large metal ramp to allow access for people with mobility problems. The original entrance to the far right has steps leading to a round-arched lobby, now giving access to the gym that was added to the north end of the Grant Building. All the windows to the Grant Building have been replaced with plastic ones.

The Silverthorne Building has an irregular south front facing the main playground which is enclosed by the Grant Building to the west and the Edgar Building to the south. The two-storey left-hand side to the Silverthorne Building has a central gable and scattered fenestration. To the right is a four-centred-arched entrance lobby with steps leading to the main entrance, now with plastic doors and windows. The gabled wing to the right, slightly set back, has large stone square mullioned windows, identical to those to the long, gabled east and west elevations. The north gable end is blind. Historic maps indicate the building extended further northwards at this end. All the windows to the Silverthorne Building have been replaced with plastic ones.

INTERIOR: the interior of the former caretakers Lodge was not inspected. The interiors of both the Grant Building and the Silverthorne Building have been much altered and contain no visible original fixtures and fittings of interest, except for some of the stone corbels supporting the roof. Though now no longer visible due to the lowering of the ceiling with modern panels, this probably consists of an open timber roof structure which is likely to survive at least partly intact, though this could not be verified.

The Edgar Building contains some of its historic carpentry, mainly including doors, and arched classroom windows overlooking the open, double-height hall. The hall has two arched-braced timber trusses resting on decorative corbels and finials below the tie beams, in the centre resting on a row of cast-iron columns. The walls to the hall have plain timber panelling up to a dado rail. To the east of the hall a doorway with deep square-panelled reveals gives access to the library which has a plain timber queen-post roof. The lower parts of the walls to the corridor along the south side of the hall, and that leading to the round-arched entrance hall, are lined with glazed brick, now painted over. The main corridor along the south side of the hall contains three round arched openings to either side, possibly former pupil entrances, those to the east now blocked up. As part of the late-C20 refurbishments, a new entrance, reception area and school office were created at the west end of this corridor, by subdividing former classrooms at this end.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The school has three late-C19 or early-C20 playground shelters built to a long rectangular plan, one standing in the playground in the north part of the site, opposite Silverthorne Building, and two extending from the front and rear elevations of the Edgar Building. They are constructed in random coursed pennant stone with red tiled roofs resting on cast iron columns. Their roof timbers survive partly intact, though two of the shelters have been filled in. Behind the Lodge the south front of Edgar Building facing Bishop Road, consists of a two-storey central block with lower wings extending to either side. The right hand side of this main elevation (the former infants, later nursery school) could formerly be seen from Bishop Road and Cambridge Road (as shown on the photograph of circa 1900), but is now unfortunately obscured by tree growth and a modern flat-roofed electrical mains building. The central block has three full dormers each with triple limestone-mullioned windows with round-arched lights. At ground-floor level are two round-arched entrances set between tall six-over-six paned sash windows. The triple sash windows to the left-hand side may have formerly been open, as they are aligned with three round arches, probably former pupil entrances. The lower wing to the west has three full dormers, that to the far west containing the headteacher's room with three small six-over-six paned sash windows. Below, there are three small windows at ground-floor level, possibly formerly open as they are aligned with three internal open arches, and as such may be former pupil entrances. The other two dormers have full-height triple-mullioned windows with round-arched lights, as before. The north elevation of Edgar Building has tall gable ends each with tall, triple stone-mullioned windows with a relieving arch above, and flanked to either side by slightly lower stone mullion windows. The original timber windows have all been replaced with plastic ones.

The main elevation to the east has four gables each with full-height double stone mullioned round-headed lights (except for that at the far right-hand side). In between the gables are small double stone mullions, with the second one to the right now converted into an entrance with a large metal ramp to allow access for people with mobility problems. The original entrance to the far right has steps leading to a round-arched lobby, now giving access to the gym that was added to the north end of the Grant Building. All the windows to the Grant Building have been replaced with plastic ones.

The Silverthorne Building has an irregular south front facing the main playground which is enclosed by the Grant Building to the west and the Edgar Building to the south. The two-storey left-hand side to the Silverthorne Building has a central gable and scattered fenestration. To the right is a four-centred-arched entrance lobby with steps leading to the main entrance, now with plastic doors and windows. The gabled wing to the right, slightly set back, has large stone square mullioned windows, identical to those to the long, gabled east and west elevations. The north gable end is blind. Historic maps indicate the building extended further northwards at this end. All the windows to the Silverthorne Building have been replaced with plastic ones.

INTERIOR: the interior of the former caretakers Lodge was not inspected. The interiors of both the Grant Building and the Silverthorne Building have been much altered and contain no visible original fixtures and fittings of interest, except for some of the stone corbels supporting the roof. Though now no longer visible due to the lowering of the ceiling with modern panels, this probably consists of an open timber roof structure which is likely to survive at least partly intact, though this could not be verified.

The Edgar Building contains some of its historic carpentry, mainly including doors, and arched classroom windows overlooking the open, double-height hall. The hall has two arched-braced timber trusses resting on decorative corbels and finials below the tie beams, in the centre resting on a row of cast-iron columns. The walls to the hall have plain timber panelling up to a dado rail. To the east of the hall a doorway with deep square-panelled reveals gives access to the library which has a plain timber queen-post roof. The lower parts of the walls to the corridor along the south side of the hall, and that leading to the round-arched entrance hall, are lined with glazed brick, now painted over. The main corridor along the south side of the hall contains three round arched openings to either side, possibly former pupil entrances, those to the east now blocked up. As part of the late-C20 refurbishments, a new entrance, reception area and school office were created at the west end of this corridor, by subdividing former classrooms at this end.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: The school has three late-C19 or early-C20 playground shelters built to a long rectangular plan, one standing in the playground in the north part of the site, opposite Silverthorne Building, and two extending from the front and rear elevations of the Edgar Building. They are constructed in random coursed pennant stone with red tiled roofs resting on cast iron columns. Their roof timbers survive partly intact, though two of the shelters have been filled in.

SELECTED SOURCES:
Foyle, A, Pevsner Architectural Guides: Bristol, 2004, p35, pp279-280
Dictionary of Scottish Architects, Architect Biography Report for William Venn Gough,
http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk/architect full.php?ide=203031 accessed 2 Dec 2013
The National Archives, Records of Bristol Board Schools [no ref.] 1792-2000,
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=002-21131&cid=-1, accessed
3 Dec 2013.
Ordnance Survey map, 25", published 1903
Ordnance Survey map, 25", published 1916
Bristol City Council, Design, Access and Planning Statement for Bishop Road Primary School, Oct 2013.
 

 

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